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Firefighter Grateful to Hoodland

By Ty Walker

Firefighter Grateful to Hoodland

His name is Hunter Parrot. And yes, he enjoys hunting, especially deer and elk. He’s also absolutely nuts about fly fishing and loves to ski. He’s an outdoorsman with a name that suits him well. Now he has found an occupation that is the perfect fit.
He’s been a volunteer firefighter at Hoodland Fire District for more than two years. Before joining the local fire district, he paid for tuition at Mt. Hood Community College with money he earned in his five years of commercial fishing in Alaska, gillnetting sockeye salmon.
He is grateful to Hoodland for training him to become a firefighter and emergency medical technician. He has continued to work as a Hoodland volunteer even after landing a full time job at Warm Springs Fire And Safety.
“I absolutely love working with the people I work with,” Parrot said. “It’s like a family in both departments. Hoodland brought me into this industry. I had never had any fire experience before Hoodland. I went to the academy and they gave me the basis of knowledge I have today.”
“It’s fun and exhilarating,” Parrot said. “The satisfaction of helping people. I enjoy being the one to help out when things are chaotic and go south. It’s always something new.”
Parrot enjoys the family atmosphere and esprit de corps shared by firefighters around the Welches station.
Before joining the Hoodland Student Academy Parrot worked ski patrol at Timberline Lodge. In the summertime, he was a fly fishing guide on the Deschutes River.
Parrot grew up in Damascus. He and his girlfriend now live in the Brightwood community on Mount Hood. He earned an associates of science degree in Wilderness Leadership Experiential Education.
He thrives on the challenge of being a firefighter: being called to a scene and presented with a problem to solve. It’s his job to solve whatever problem is presented to him.
“Basically, you’re driving around in a giant tool box and when you arrive on the scene, you’ve got the tools,” Parrot said. “It’s up to you and your crew to problem-solve the situation that’s in front of you.”
Hoodland Fire District is a combination department consisting of career and volunteer staff who respond to fire and medical emergencies. The district is always looking for volunteers. Hoodland Fire District relies on volunteers working side-by-side with career personnel to respond to around 1,000 calls for service each year.
For more information, phone 503-622-3256 or go to https://www.hoodlandfire.us/.

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